Both are places where people can settle disputes. Courts are typically reserved for more serious criminal cases, while tribunals are often used for less serious offenses. Tribunals also tend to have simpler procedures than courts, and they usually don’t require lawyers.

What is a court?

A court is a legal body with the authority to adjudicate disputes between parties and carry out the administration of justice in civil, criminal, and administrative matters by the rule of law.

What is a tribunal?

A tribunal is a formal, independent body set up to adjudicate disputes. It is usually presided over by one or more experts in the relevant field, and its decisions are binding. Tribunals typically have a lower standard of proof than courts, and their procedures are often less formal.

Tribunals are often used to resolve disputes between businesses or between individuals and businesses. They can also be used to review administrative decisions made by government agencies. Many countries have specialist tribunals, such as the Employment Tribunal in the UK, which deals with disputes between employers and employees.

How courts and tribunals differ

A court is a formal, independent body that hears legal cases and makes decisions by the law. Courts are usually presided over by a judge, and they have the power to issue binding judgments.

A tribunal is a less formal body that is typically used to resolve disputes between individuals or businesses. Tribunals are usually presided over by a panel of experts, and they have the power to make binding decisions.

Why choose one over the other?

Courts are generally more formal than tribunals, and the procedures can be more complex. This means that it can be harder to represent yourself in court, and you may need to hire a lawyer. However, courts have the power to impose harsher penalties than tribunals, so if you are seeking a tougher punishment for the other party, going to court may be your best option.

Tribunals tend to be less formal than courts, and the procedures are usually simpler. This makes it easier to represent yourself in a tribunal, as you will not need to hire a lawyer. Tribunals also have the power to make binding decisions, so if you are seeking a quick resolution to your issue, going to a tribunal may be your best option.

 

Photo by Saúl Bucio on Unsplash

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