Kinematics and kinetics are two areas of physics that are closely related but have distinct differences. Kinematics deals with the motion of objects, while kinetics looks at how forces act on them. Kinematics deals with describing how something moves, while kinetics deals with explaining why something moves. Understanding these concepts can help you better understand how different kinds of movement work and give you a deeper appreciation for the world around us.

Kinematics

(Robert Owen-Wahl from Pixabay)

Picture of train moving fast

Kinematics is the branch of classical mechanics that describes the motion of points, bodies (objects), and systems of bodies (groups of objects) without considering the forces that caused the motion.

Kinetics

(Theo Crazzolara on Unsplash)

Picture of a hammer smashing a biscuit

Kinetics is the branch of classical mechanics that studies the causes of motion, or more precisely, the forces that cause or change motion. We can describe the motion using words, diagrams, numbers, and equations. In kinetics, we study the forces that cause motion. With an understanding of the forces, we can predict how objects will move in response to the forces.

Kinematics Vs. Kinetics – Key differences

The study of kinematics is concerned with the motion of objects without regard to the forces that cause the motion. In contrast, kinetics is the study of the forces that cause motion. The distinction between the two is often illustrated by considering a ball rolling down a hill. The kinematic description would simply be the position and velocity of the ball as a function of time. The kinetic description would be more concerned with the force of gravity acting on the ball and how this force causes the ball to accelerate down the hill.

Applications of Kinematics and Kinetics

Kinematics is the branch of mechanics that studies the motion of bodies without regard to their mass or the forces that cause the motion. Kinetics, on the other hand, is concerned with the force that produces motion, as well as its relationship to mass and velocity.

In many cases, kinematics and kinetics are used together to describe the motion of objects. For example, when a car is speeding up or slowing down, both kinematic and kinetic effects are at play. The car’s speed is a kinematic quantity, while the force exerted by the engine (or brakes) is a kinetic quantity.

Kinematics can be used to solve problems involving objects in linear motion, such as projectile motion. In this case, we can use kinematics equations to find out how far an object will travel given its starting velocity and acceleration. Similarly, we can use kinematics equations to determine an object’s velocity at a given point in time if we know its starting velocity and acceleration.

Kinetics comes into play when we want to know how forces affect moving objects. For example, Newton’s second law of motion states that the force exerted on an object is equal to its mass multiplied by its acceleration. This equation allows us to calculate the force needed to produce a given acceleration in an object of known mass.

Why are kinetics better than kinematics when studying motion?

There are several reasons why kinetics tend to be better than kinematics when studying motion. First, kinetics take into account the forces acting on an object, while kinematics do not. This means that kinetics can provide a more accurate picture of how an object is moving. Additionally, kinetics can be used to predict how an object will move in response to certain forces, while kinematics cannot. Finally, kinetics can be used to study the effects of friction and other resistive forces on motion, while kinematics cannot.

What are examples of kinetics and kinematics?

There are many examples of kinetics in our everyday lives. Anything that involves movement, such as a car moving down the road or a person walking across a room, is an example of kinetics. The study of how these objects move and interact with their surroundings is what kinetics is all about.

In kinematics, we are concerned with describing the motion of objects. This includes quantities such as velocity, acceleration, and displacement. Kinetics, on the other hand, is concerned with the forces that cause motion. Examples of kinematics would be a ball rolling down a hill or a car turning a corner. An example of kinetics would be a car accelerating from a stop light or a person jumping off a diving board.

Frequently asked questions about kinetics & kinematics

Why is it called kinetics?

There are a few reasons why kinetics is referred to as such. In Greek, the word “kinesis” means motion. Therefore, the study of kinetics is the study of motion and its causes. Additionally, the term “kinetics” comes from the Latin word “kineticus,” which means “moving.”

What are the 5 kinematics?

The five kinematics are:

1) Velocity
2) Acceleration
3) Displacement
4) Frame of Reference
5) Time

Why is it important to understand kinetics?

In order to understand the motion of objects, it is important to understand the principles of kinetics. Kinetics is the study of how forces affect the motion of objects. By understanding the principles of kinetics, we can better understand how objects move and interact with their surroundings.

 

Featured Image by Pixabay at pexles.com

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