Centrifugal force is the force that pushes things away from the centre, while centripetal force is the force that pulls things toward the centre.

How do these forces affect objects?

There are two types of forces that can act on an object: centrifugal force and centripetal force. Centrifugal force is a force that acts on an object in a direction that is away from the centre of rotation. Centripetal force is a force that acts on an object in a direction that is toward the centre of rotation.

Centrifugal force can cause an object to move in a circle or spiral. The faster the object moves, the greater the centrifugal force. Centripetal force can cause an object to move in a straight line. The faster the object moves, the greater the centripetal force.

Centrifugal force and centripetal force can both affect how an object moves. For example, if you are spinning a ball on a string, the ball will move in a circle because of the centrifugal force acting on it. If you stop spinning the ball, it will fly off in a straight line because of the centripetal force acting on it.

What are some everyday examples of these forces?

There are many everyday examples of forces that can be classified as either centrifugal or centripetal. Some common examples include:

-Tying a knot in a rope
-Swinging a baseball bat
– riding a roller coaster
– Spinning a top
– Whipping cream with a whisk

In each of these cases, there is an object that is moving in a circle (or near enough to a circle to approximate one). The object has mass and so it experiences a force due to its inertia. This force is directed away from the centre of the circle and is known as the centrifugal force. If this force were not present, the object would simply travel in a straight line.

The second type of force at play in these examples is known as the centripetal force. This force is directed towards the centre of the circle and it balances out the centrifugal force. Without the centripetal force, the object would fly off in a straight line tangent to its original path. In order for an object to move in a circle (or close to one), there must be some net centripetal force acting on it.

 

Photo by Sunder Muthukumaran on Unsplash

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