Coercion is when someone is forced to do something against their will. Leading, on the other hand, is when someone is persuaded to do something that they may not have initially wanted to do or gently guiding someone in the direction you want them to go.

What is coercion?

Coercion is defined as the act of compelling someone to do something against their will, typically using force or threats. For example, if you threaten to harm someone unless they comply with your demands, that would be considered coercion. As an example, in an office environment, coerciveness is when a leader uses their position of power to force others to do what they want. This type of leadership can be effective in the short term, but it often leads to resentment and resistance among employees.

What is leading?

Leading, is when the leader inspires and motivates others to achieve a goal. It is defined as the act of influencing or persuading someone to do something. This can be done through various means such as offering rewards, providing incentives, or simply making a persuasive argument. Unlike coercion, leading does not involve force or threats and is instead based on positive motivation. This type of leadership for example, in an office environment, creates buy-in from employees and can lead to long-term success.

The difference between coercion and leading

There are a few key differences between coercion and leading. First, coercion is typically done with the intent to force someone to do something against their will, while leading is typically done with the intent to persuade or influence someone to do something. Additionally, coercion often uses threats or violence to get someone to comply, while leading usually uses more gentle methods such as reasoning or appeals to emotion. Finally, coercion usually results in resentment or resistance from the person being coerced, while leading often results in cooperation or agreement.

Examples of coercion and leading

Coercion:

• A parent telling their child that they have to eat their vegetables before they can have dessert
• A boss telling an employee that they have to work late tonight or they will be fired
• A salesperson telling a customer that they need to buy now or the price will go up

Leading:

• A parent asking their child if they want to eat their vegetables first or have dessert first
• A boss suggesting to an employee that it might be beneficial to stay late and get some extra work done tonight
• A salesperson informing a customer of a time-sensitive discount

When to use coercion and leading

There are times when it is appropriate to use coercion or leading in order to get the outcomes we desire. Here are some guidelines to help you determine when it is appropriate to use these methods:

-If someone is engaging in behavior that is harmful to themselves or others, coercion or leading may be necessary in order to stop them.
-If someone is resistant to change and is stuck in a pattern of negative behavior, coercion or leading may be necessary in order for them to make a positive change.
-If someone is unable or unwilling to make a decision, coercion or leading may be necessary in order to help them move forward.

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You May Also Like

What is the difference between cologne and perfume?

Table of Contents Hide What is cologne?What is perfume?The history of cologne…

What’s the difference between spectacles and contact lenses?

Table of Contents Hide SpectaclesContact lensesWhich one should I chooseSpectacles Vs. Contact…

What is the difference between psychologists and psychiatrists?

Table of Contents Hide The different types of mental health professionalsWhich approach…